DLANZ Relaunch Original 2001 Whakanui Oranga NZ Disability Strategy... Tare te Haki

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Raise the Flag The 2016 version removes Aims still to fulfill and the Maori title. DLANZ do not accept or recognize that document as valid and reject Minister Wagner's attempt to destroy Our People Nga Hauaa

THE NEW ZEALAND DISABILITY STRATEGY

MAKING A WORLD OF DIFFERENCE
WHAKANUI ORANGA

Minister for Disability Issues

April 2001

Published in April 2001 by the Ministry of Health
PO Box 5013, Wellington, New Zealand

ISBN: 0-478-24358-8 (Book)
ISBN: 0-478-24359-6 (Internet)

This document is available on Web site:
http://www.odi.govt.nz

This document is available in large font, Braille, audiotape or in an easy-to-read version on request from:
Office for Disability Issues
Ministry of Social Development
PO Box 12136
WELLINGTON
E-mail: odi@msd.govt.nz

FOREWORD FROM THE MINISTER FOR DISABILITY ISSUES

E ngä iwi, e ngä reo, e ngä karangatanga maha o ngä hau e whä, tënei te mihi atu ki a koutou kätoa. Tënä koutou, tënä koutou, ä, tënä koutou katoa.
Tihei mauriora.

To all people, all voices, all the many relations from the four winds, I greet you all.

One in five New Zealanders has a long-term impairment. Many are unable to reach their potential or participate fully in the community because of barriers they face doing things that most New Zealanders take for granted. The barriers range from the purely physical, such as access to facilities, to the attitudinal, due to poor awareness of disability issues.

The aim of the New Zealand Disability Strategy: Making a World of Difference – Whakanui Oranga is to eliminate these barriers wherever they exist.

The Strategy will guide Government action to promote a more inclusive society. It is an enduring framework which will ensure that government departments and other government agencies consider disabled people before making decisions. It will sit alongside other government programmes such as the Positive Ageing Strategy, the New Zealand Health Strategy and the Re-evaluation of Human Rights Protections in New Zealand.

The Government will take the lead – but we will also be doing everything we can to influence the attitudes and behaviour of society as a whole. All New Zealanders need to consider issues for disabled people and their aspirations as individuals. We must also consider the families and whänau of disabled people, and others who support them.

The New Zealand Disability Strategy has been developed with extensive input from the disability sector. During the consultation period, 700 submissions were received, including feedback from 68 meetings around the country. A summary of consultation findings is available from the Ministry of Health.

Thank you to all those who attended meetings, made submissions and promoted the Strategy. In particular, I want to thank the members of the sector reference group, whose tireless work has played a major part in its successful development.

The Government is committed to the New Zealand Disability Strategy. Each year government departments will develop work plans which set out specific steps to implement the Strategy. These plans will be monitored annually, and a review of overall progress will occur after five and ten years.

I have appreciated the opportunity to be Minister for Disability Issues during one of the most exciting periods of developmental work on disability issues. In the five years since I was Labour's disability spokesperson, there has been an exponential change of attitude, including changes in language and understanding. I am grateful to all those who helped bring me up to speed during this challenging time.

I also want to acknowledge my colleague Ruth Dyson, the first Minister for Disability Issues, who has raised the profile of disability issues both inside and outside Government and who laid the strong foundations on which the Strategy is built.

I am keen to shepherd the New Zealand Disability Strategy through the next stage of implementation, in an active and collaborative way with disabled people. Working together, I am confident that we can, indeed, make a world of difference.

Hon Lianne Dalziel
Minister for Disability Issues

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

The development of the New Zealand Disability Strategy has involved valued input from a wide range of individuals, groups and organisations. The advice and assistance from the following contributors is particularly acknowledged:

• New Zealand Disability Strategy sector reference group
• Disabled Persons Assembly (New Zealand) Inc, especially those local representatives who hosted consultation meetings
• workshop, hui, fono and focus group participants and everyone who made a submission on the New Zealand Disability Strategy discussion document
• the Auckland Disability Providers Network
• organisations that helped with accessible versions of the New Zealand Disability Strategy discussion document, especially the Royal New Zealand Foundation for the Blind and IHC
• New Zealand Sign Language interpreters who provided their services at consultation meetings.

Acknowledging the special relationship between Mäori and the Crown under the Treaty of Waitangi

The Treaty of Waitangi is New Zealand’s founding document and the Government is committed to fulfilling its obligations as a Treaty partner.  This special relationship is ongoing and is based on the underlying premise that Mäori should continue to live in Aotearoa as Mäori.

Central to the Treaty relationship and implementation of Treaty principles is a common understanding that Mäori will have an important role in developing and implementing disability strategies for Mäori and that the Crown and Mäori will relate to each other in good faith with mutual respect, co-operation and trust.

Mäori should be able to define and provide for their own priorities for participation and be encouraged to develop the capacity for delivery of services to their communities.  This needs to be balanced by the Crown’s duty to govern on behalf of the total population.

To date, the relationship between Mäori and the Crown in the disability sector has been based on three key principles:

• participation at all levels
• partnership in service delivery
• protection and improvement of Mäori wellbeing.

CONTENTS

FOREWORD FROM THE MINISTER FOR DISABILITY ISSUES 3
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 5
SUMMARY 7
INTRODUCTION 9
VISION OF A NON-DISABLING SOCIETY 11
BARRIERS 12
DELIVERING THE STRATEGY 14
THE GOVERNMENT’S OBJECTIVES 15
ACTIONS 17
OBJECTIVE 1: ENCOURAGE AND EDUCATE FOR A NON-DISABLING SOCIETY 17
OBJECTIVE 2: ENSURE RIGHTS FOR DISABLED PEOPLE 18
OBJECTIVE 3: PROVIDE THE BEST EDUCATION FOR DISABLED PEOPLE 19
OBJECTIVE 4: PROVIDE OPPORTUNITIES IN EMPLOYMENT AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT FOR DISABLED PEOPLE 20
OBJECTIVE 5: FOSTER LEADERSHIP BY DISABLED PEOPLE 22
OBJECTIVE 6: FOSTER AN AWARE AND RESPONSIVE PUBLIC SERVICE 23
OBJECTIVE 7: CREATE LONG-TERM SUPPORT SYSTEMS CENTRED ON THE INDIVIDUAL 24
OBJECTIVE 8: SUPPORT QUALITY LIVING IN THE COMMUNITY FOR DISABLED PEOPLE 25
OBJECTIVE 9: SUPPORT LIFESTYLE CHOICES, RECREATION AND CULTURE FOR DISABLED PEOPLE 26
OBJECTIVE 10: COLLECT AND USE RELEVANT INFORMATION ABOUT DISABLED PEOPLE AND DISABILITY ISSUES 27
OBJECTIVE 11: PROMOTE PARTICIPATION OF DISABLED MÄORI 28
OBJECTIVE 12: PROMOTE PARTICIPATION OF DISABLED PACIFIC PEOPLES 29
OBJECTIVE 13: ENABLE DISABLED CHILDREN AND YOUTH TO LEAD FULL AND ACTIVE LIVES 30
OBJECTIVE 14: PROMOTE PARTICIPATION OF DISABLED WOMEN IN ORDER TO IMPROVE THEIR QUALITY OF LIFE 31
OBJECTIVE 15: VALUE FAMILIES, WHÄNAU AND PEOPLE PROVIDING ONGOING SUPPORT 32
APPENDIX : MEMBERSHIP OF THE NEW ZEALAND DISABILITY STRATEGY SECTOR REFERENCE GROUP 33

SUMMARY

The New Zealand Disability Strategy presents a long-term plan for changing New Zealand from a disabling to an inclusive society. It has been developed in consultation with disabled people and the wider disability sector, and reflects many individuals’ experiences of disability.

Disability is not something individuals have. What individuals have are impairments. They may be physical, sensory, neurological, psychiatric, intellectual or other impairments. Disability is the process which happens when one group of people create barriers by designing a world only for their way of living, taking no account of the impairments other people have.

Along with other New Zealanders, disabled people aspire to a good life. However, they also face huge barriers to achieving the life that so many take for granted. These barriers are created when we build a society that takes no account of the impairments other people have. Our society is built in a way that assumes we can all see signs, read directions, hear announcements, reach buttons, have the strength to open heavy doors and have stable moods and perceptions.

Underpinning the New Zealand Disability Strategy is a vision of a fully inclusive society. New Zealand will be inclusive when people with impairments can say they live in:

‘A society that highly values our lives and continually enhances our full participation.’

Achieving this vision will involve ensuring that disabled people have a meaningful partnership with Government, communities and support agencies, based on respect and equality. Disabled people will be integrated into community life on their own terms, their abilities will be valued, their diversity and interdependence will be recognised, and their human rights will be protected. Achieving this vision will also involve recognising the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi.

To advance New Zealand towards a fully inclusive society, the Strategy includes fifteen Objectives, underpinned by detailed Actions. The Objectives are to:
1. encourage and educate for a non-disabling society
2. ensure rights for disabled people
3. provide the best education for disabled people
4. provide opportunities in employment and economic development for disabled people
5. foster leadership by disabled people
6. foster an aware and responsive public service
7. create long-term support systems centred on the individual
8. support quality living in the community for disabled people
9. support lifestyle choices, recreation and culture for disabled people
10. collect and use relevant information about disabled people and disability issues
11. promote participation of disabled Mäori
12. promote participation of disabled Pacific peoples
13. enable disabled children and youth to lead full and active lives
14. promote participation of disabled women in order to improve their quality of life
15. value families, whänau and people providing ongoing support.

Key government departments will produce an implementation work plan for the 2001/02 year showing what they are doing towards implementation of the Strategy. This annual planning process will then be rolled out to other departments in 2002/03. The Minister for Disability Issues will report to Parliament annually on progress in implementing the Strategy and full reviews of progress will be conducted after five and ten years.

INTRODUCTION
‘Disability is in society, not in me.’

‘I have the right to dignity, to develop my potential, to use my qualities and skills.’

– Consultation comments

We live in a disabling society. The New Zealand Disability Strategy presents a plan for changing this.

Disability is not something individuals have. What individuals have are impairments. They may be physical, sensory, neurological, psychiatric, intellectual or other impairments.

Disability is the process which happens when one group of people create barriers by designing a world only for their way of living, taking no account of the impairments other people have. Our society is built in a way that assumes that we can all move quickly from one side of the road to the other; that we can all see signs, read directions, hear announcements, reach buttons, have the strength to open heavy doors and have stable moods and perceptions.

Although New Zealand has standards for accessibility, schools, workplaces, supermarkets, banks, movie theatres, marae, churches and houses are, in the main, designed and built by non-disabled people for non-disabled users. This is our history of disability in New Zealand.

Disability relates to the interaction between the person with the impairment and the environment. It has a lot to do with discrimination, and has a lot in common with other attitudes and behaviours such as racism and sexism that are not acceptable in our society.

People and groups of people should not be judged by one particular aspect of their lives – whether it’s their race, gender, age or impairment. Individual beliefs and assumptions, as well as the practices of institutions, mean that many disabled people are not able to access things that many non-disabled people take for granted.

The desire to break down the barriers that cause disability is also closely linked to ideas about the human rights of people with impairments. Without human rights we cannot live as full human beings.

Human rights include political, civil, social, cultural and economic rights. Human rights are described by international instruments – such as the Universal Declaration on Human Rights and core treaties such as the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) and the Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCROC). In New Zealand we have legislation such as the Bill of Rights Act, the Human Rights Act and the Privacy Act.

In the New Zealand Disability Strategy discussion document, the term ‘people experiencing disability’ was used throughout the document. There was a mixed reaction to this term – some people liked it and thought it was a good way of expressing that disability is something that happens to people who have impairments. Other people thought it was over-complicated.

The New Zealand Disability Strategy sector reference group has recommended that this final Strategy should use the term ‘disabled people’ to refer to the people at the heart of this Strategy.

VISION OF A NON-DISABLING SOCIETY

Along with other New Zealanders, disabled people aspire to a good life.

The vision of this Strategy is a fully inclusive society. New Zealand will be inclusive when people with impairments can say they live in:

‘A society that highly values our lives and continually enhances our full participation.’

This will happen in a country where:
• disabled people have a meaningful partnership with Government, communities and support agencies, based on respect and equality
• we have moved forward from exclusion, tolerance and accommodation of disabled people to a fully inclusive and mutually supportive society
• disabled people are integrated into community life on their own terms. This means that equal opportunities are assured but individual choices are available and respected
• the abilities of disabled people are valued and not questioned
• interdependence is recognised and valued, especially the important relationships between disabled people and their families, friends, whänau and other people who provide support
• human rights are protected as a fundamental cornerstone of government policy and practice
• the diversity of disabled people, including their cultural backgrounds, is recognised, and there is flexibility to support their differing aspirations and goals
• disabled people are treated equitably, regardless of gender, age, cultural background, type of impairment or when and how the impairment was acquired
• community-based services ensure that disabled people are supported to live in their own communities, and institutionalisation is eliminated
• the idea that society imposes many of the disabling barriers faced by people with impairments is widely understood and, therefore, legislation, policy and other activities enhance rather than disable the lives of people with impairments
• the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi are recognised.

BARRIERS

‘More often than not, barriers are made out of peoples’ ignorance towards something different.’

– Consultation comment

One in five people in New Zealand reports having a long-term impairment.  Because everyone comes from different backgrounds, holds different beliefs and has different needs, there is a great diversity of people who have impairments.

The key common factor among people with impairments is that they face many lifelong barriers to their full participation in New Zealand society.

Attitudes have been identified, through consultation, as the major barrier that operates at all levels of daily life in the general population.  Attitudes and ignorance make their presence felt as stigma, prejudice and discrimination.  In the year to June 1999, disability discrimination was the largest category of complaints to the Human Rights Commission.

Stigma, prejudice and discrimination affect our behaviours.  Sometimes the combination of attitudes and behaviours can seem to create almost insurmountable barriers, for example, whole systems or organisations can become a barrier much in the way that institutionalised racism operates.

When I’m a child …

• For disabled children, it is hard to get the best start to their life ahead. Children’s needs can put big demands, including financial pressure, on their families and whänau.

When I’m a youth …

• Disabled people are much less likely to have educational qualifications than non-disabled people.

When I’m an adult …

• Disabled people are much less likely to be employed. For instance, the unemployment rate for people with ongoing mental illness is very high. Half of recent complaints to the Human Rights Commission in regard to disability related to employment.
• The public service employs a far lower proportion of disabled people than exist in the general working age population, despite equal employment opportunity policies.
• Disabled people often have reduced housing options through poverty or factors such as discrimination when neighbours object to supported houses being established in their area.

When I’m older …

• Older people experience difficulties when their problems are seen as an inevitable part of ageing. Faced with this attitude, they may miss the opportunity to remain able and independent through rehabilitation, correction of health problems or provision of support services.
• For older disabled people, one of the biggest problems can be being denied the opportunity to remain in their familiar surroundings and ‘age in place’. Even in their own homes, some can feel isolated and insecure if they have limited contact with families, friends and their community.

My whole life …

• Despite New Zealand having strong standards for physical accessibility, access to public facilities and other buildings such as marae is poor. On top of that, most public transport is not independently accessible, and car modifications are expensive.
• People in higher socio-economic areas are more likely to access and receive support services than people in low socio-economic areas. Reflecting this situation, Mäori as well as Pacific peoples are typically low users of support services.
• Forty-four percent of Mäori with a long-term impairment report that they have an unmet need for some kind of service or assistance. Twenty-nine percent of non-Mäori with a long-term impairment report an unmet need. The majority of support for everyday activities comes from families.
• Poor literacy is a problem for many and is a cause of communication barriers. This problem extends to Braille and sign language literacy.
• Disabled people, especially those with psychiatric or intellectual impairments, are often shut out of social networks and full participation in community activities, because people are ignorant or fearful of behaviour they perceive as different.
• As a group, disabled people are likely to have lower incomes and fewer financial and family resources than the general population. This economic disadvantage is compounded by the financial cost of disability. The earning potential of families with disabled children can be curtailed by their need to provide support for their children or live and work in areas where they can access family or professional support.
• Disabled women are more likely to have low incomes than men or non-disabled women. Seventy-one percent of women with long-term impairments report an annual personal income of less than $15,000.
• Disabled people are almost three times as likely to get income from a government benefit than non-disabled people (excluding superannuation from this calculation).

Although the Government provides a range of services, the experience of accessing these services can be very disabling because sometimes they are not flexible enough to meet individual needs.  To get a benefit, a piece of equipment, or maybe some help at home you might have to tell your story to three or four different people — just to get what you need at that particular time.  Next year those three or four people may have moved on, with a new lot of assessors in their place.  

These kind of arrangements and turnover of staff are disabling because the person, their families and whänau spend a lot of time fighting the system, in order to get access to the same opportunities other New Zealanders have.

The Government needs to help open the way into community life for disabled people — by removing the barriers to their participation.

DELIVERING THE STRATEGY

Under the New Zealand Public Health and Disability Act 2000, the Minister for Disability Issues is required to have a New Zealand Disability Strategy.  The Government recognises that a lot of work is required to remove the barriers to participation faced by disabled people and create a fully inclusive society. As part of the New Zealand Disability Strategy, 15 Objectives and detailed Actions to achieve this have been developed.

Government departments are expected to develop annual New Zealand Disability Strategy implementation work plans that spell out what work they are doing to implement the Strategy.  Key departments will develop their initial implementation work plans for the period 1 July 2001 to 30 June 2002.  This annual planning process will then be rolled out to other departments in 2002/03.  

Government initiatives that will benefit disabled people, such as the New Zealand Positive Ageing Strategy, the New Zealand Health Strategy, the Mäori Health Strategy and the Pacific Health and Disability Action Plan, will complement the New Zealand Disability Strategy.

The decisions that territorial authorities and non-departmental public bodies make also have a significant impact on the lives of disabled people.  It is important that territorial authorities and other public bodies support and assist with implementing the New Zealand Disability Strategy, and ways of making this happen need to be considered in discussion with them.

The Minister for Disability Issues will report to Parliament annually on progress in implementing the Strategy and full reviews of progress will be conducted after five and ten years.


THE GOVERNMENT’S OBJECTIVES

Fifteen Objectives have been developed for the New Zealand Disability Strategy.

Objective 1:    Encourage and educate for a non-disabling society

• Encourage the emergence of a non-disabling society that respects and highly values the lives of disabled people and supports inclusive communities.

Objective 2:    Ensure rights for disabled people

• Uphold and promote the rights of disabled people.

Objective 3:    Provide the best education for disabled people

• Improve education so that all children, youth and adult learners will have equal opportunities to learn and develop in their local, regular educational centres.

Objective 4:    Provide opportunities in employment and economic development for disabled people

• Enable disabled people to work in the open labour market (in accordance with human rights principles) and maintain an adequate income.

Objective 5:    Foster leadership by disabled people

• Acknowledge the experience of disability as a form of specialised knowledge and strengthen the leadership of disabled people.

Objective 6:    Foster an aware and responsive public service

• Ensure that government agencies, publicly funded services and publicly accountable bodies (such as territorial authorities) are aware of and responsive to disabled people.

Objective 7:    Create long-term support systems centred on the individual

• Create a quality assessment and service delivery system that is centred on disabled people, ensures their participation in assessment and service delivery, has invisible borders and is easy to access.

Objective 8:    Support quality living in the community for disabled people

• Provide opportunities for disabled people to have their own homes and lives in the community.

Objective 9:    Support lifestyle choices, recreation and culture for disabled people

• Create and support lifestyle choices for disabled people within the community and promote access to recreation and cultural opportunities.

Objective 10:   Collect and use relevant information about disabled people and disability issues

• Improve the quality of relevant disability information collected, analysed and used, including regular national surveys of activity limitation.

Objective 11:   Promote participation of disabled Mäori

• Promote opportunities for disabled Mäori to participate in their communities and access disability services. Disabled Mäori should receive an equitable level of resource that is delivered in a culturally appropriate way.

Objective 12:   Promote participation of disabled Pacific peoples

• Promote opportunities for disabled Pacific peoples to participate in their communities and access disability services. Disabled Pacific peoples should receive an equitable level of resource that is delivered in a culturally appropriate way.

Objective 13:   Enable disabled children and youth to lead full and active lives

• Disabled children and youth should enjoy full and active lives, in conditions that prepare them for adulthood and which:
• ensure their dignity
• affirm their right to a good future and to participate in education, relationships, leisure, work and political processes
• recognise their emerging identities as individuals and reinforce their sense of self
• promote self-reliance
• recognise their important links with family, friends and school
• facilitate their active participation in the community.

Objective 14:   Promote participation of disabled women in order to improve their quality of life

• Improve opportunities for disabled women to participate in their communities, access appropriate disability services, and improve their quality of life.

Objective 15:   Value families, whänau and people providing ongoing support

• Acknowledge and support the roles, responsibilities and issues facing family, whänau and those who support disabled people.

ACTIONS

These Actions will inform the annual New Zealand Disability Strategy implementation work plans to be developed by government departments.

Objective 1: Encourage and educate for a non-disabling society
Actions
1.1 Develop national and locally-based anti-discrimination programmes.

1.2 Recognise that it is disabled people who are experts on their own experience.

1.3 Recognise and honour the achievements of disabled people.

1.4 Include the perspectives of disabled people in ethical and bioethical debates.

1.5 Encourage ongoing debate on disability issues.

Objective 2: Ensure rights for disabled people
Actions

2.1 Provide information for everyone about the rights of disabled people.

2.2 Provide education to ensure that disabled people understand their rights, recognise discrimination and are able to be self-advocates.

2.3 Educate agencies responsible for supporting children and families about the rights and abilities of disabled parents.

2.4 Review Human Rights legislation to ensure the ongoing enhancement and strengthening of the rights of disabled people.

2.5 Investigate, and if appropriate, support, development of a United Nations convention on the rights of disabled people.

2.6 Investigate the level of access that disabled people have to independent advocacy, and address any shortfall in service provision.

2.7 Evaluate New Zealand’s performance on the rights of disabled people.

2.8 Consider disabled people whenever New Zealand’s performance is being evaluated against international human rights obligations, for example, the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women, and United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child.

Objective 3: Provide the best education for disabled people
Actions
3.1 Ensure that no child is denied access to their local, regular school because of their impairment.

3.2 Support the development of effective communication by providing access to education in New Zealand Sign Language, communication technologies and human aids.

3.3 Ensure that teachers and other educators understand the learning needs of disabled people.

3.4 Ensure that disabled students, families, teachers and other educators have equitable access to the resources available to meet their needs.

3.5 Facilitate opportunities for disabled students to make contact with their disabled peers in other schools.

3.6 Improve schools’ responsiveness to and accountability for the needs of disabled students.

3.7 Promote appropriate and effective inclusive educational settings that will meet individual educational needs.

3.8 Improve post-compulsory education options for disabled people, including: promoting best practice, providing career guidance, increasing lifelong opportunities for learning and better aligning financial support with educational opportunities.

Objective 4: Provide opportunities in employment and economic development for disabled people
Actions
Planning and training for entering employment

4.1 Provide education and training opportunities to increase the individual capacity of disabled people to move into employment.

4.2 Enable disabled people to lead the development of their own training and employment goals, and to participate in the development of support options to achieve those goals.

4.3 Educate employers about the abilities of disabled people.

4.4 Provide information about career options, ways to generate income, and assistance available for disabled people.

4.5 Investigate longer-term incentives to increase training, employment and development opportunities for disabled people.

4.6 Ensure a smooth transition from school to work.

4.7 Investigate the requirements of the International Labour Organisation Convention on Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment, with a view to ratification.

Employment and economic development
4.8 Encourage the development of a range of employment options recognising the diverse needs of disabled people.

4.9 Ensure disabled people have the same employment conditions, rights and entitlements as everyone else has, including minimum wage provisions for work of comparable productivity.

4.10 Make communication services, resources and flexible workplace options available.

4.11 Operate equal employment opportunity and affirmative action policies in the public sector.

4.12 Investigate a legislative framework for equal employment opportunities across the public and private sectors.

4.13 Ensure disabled people have access to economic development initiatives.

4.14 Encourage staff and service organisations (for example, unions) to appoint or elect disabled people as delegates and members of their executives.

4.15 Ensure that the needs of disabled people are taken into account in developing more flexible income support benefits, to make access to work and training easier.

4.16 Review income support provisions to ensure they provide an adequate standard of living.

Objective 5: Foster leadership by disabled people
Actions
5.1 Encourage disabled people to take part in decision-making as service users, as staff in the delivery of services, and in the governance, management, planning and evaluation within all services that disabled people access.

5.2 Assist self-help initiatives, service provision and advocacy organisations run by disabled people for disabled people.

5.3 Model the inclusion of disabled people in leadership roles within government departments, in order to encourage leadership by disabled people within all organisations.

5.4 Support the establishment of a leadership development and mentoring programme for disabled people.

5.5 Establish a register of disabled people for government appointments.

5.6 Make information available to disabled people and their advocacy organisations about how to influence government policy.

Objective 6: Foster an aware and responsive public service
Actions
6.1 Develop mechanisms to ensure that all government policy and legislation is consistent with the objectives of the New Zealand Disability Strategy.

6.2 Adapt public sector training to ensure that service development and service delivery are consistent with the New Zealand Disability Strategy.

6.3 Ensure that all government agencies treat disabled people with dignity and respect.

6.4 Improve the quality of information available, including where to go for more information, the services available and how to access them.

6.5 Make all information and communication methods offered to the general public available in formats appropriate to the different needs of disabled people.

6.6 Ensure the locations and buildings of all government agencies and public services are accessible.

6.7 Work with territorial authorities to develop ways they can support the New Zealand Disability Strategy.

Objective 7: Create long-term support systems centred on the individual
Actions
7.1 Ensure that overarching processes, eligibility criteria and allocation of resources are nationally consistent, but that individual needs are treated flexibly.

7.2 Ensure that government agencies, publicly funded services and publicly accountable bodies co-operate to ensure that the disabled person is at the centre of service delivery.

7.3 Investigate the development of a holistic approach to assessment and service provision, that applies across agencies and funding sources.

7.4 Develop and maintain effective rehabilitation services.

7.5 Encourage equity of funding and service provision for people with similar needs, regardless of the cause of their impairment.

7.6 Identify unmet need and develop affordable solutions to fill these gaps.

7.7 Improve timeliness of service provision.

7.8 Develop a highly skilled workforce to support disabled people.

7.9 Ensure that disability services do not perpetuate the myth that disabled people are ill, while recognising that disabled people do need access to health services without discrimination.

Objective 8: Support quality living in the community for disabled people
Actions
Living in the community
8.1 Increase opportunities for disabled people to live in the community with choice of affordable, quality housing.

8.2 Support disabled people living in rural areas to remain in their own communities by improving their access to services.

8.3 Support the development of independent communication for disabled people.

8.4 Ensure disabled people are able to access appropriate health services within their community.

Moving around the community

8.5 Require all new scheduled public transport to be accessible in order to phase out inaccessible public transport.

8.6 Encourage the development of accessible routes to connect buildings, public spaces and transport systems.

8.7 Develop nationally consistent access to passenger services where there is no accessible public transport.

Objective 9: Support lifestyle choices, recreation and culture for disabled people
Actions
9.1 Support disabled people in making their own choices about their relationships, sexuality and reproductive potential.

9.2 Provide opportunities for disabled people to create, perform and develop their own arts, and to access arts activities.

9.3 Educate arts administrators/organisations and other recreational and sporting organisations about disability issues and inclusion.

9.4 Support the development of arts, recreational and sports projects, including those run by and for disabled people.

Objective 10: Collect and use relevant information about disabled people and disability issues
Actions
10.1 Ensure that guidelines for research funding take into account the need for research on disability issues, include disabled people in the development and monitoring of the disability research agenda, and enable disabled people to put forward their own experiences in the context of the research.

10.2 Collect relevant and useful information about disability through all relevant surveys to inform the research programme.

10.3 Use disability research, and analyse disability data, including that from the 1996 and 2001 Disability Surveys, to contribute to policy work, service development and monitoring.

10.4 Undertake research focusing on disability issues for Mäori and Pacific peoples.

10.5 Make disability research information available to disabled people in culturally appropriate and accessible formats.

10.6 Adopt ethical and procedural standards for disability research projects.

10.7 Appoint disabled people as members of ethics committees.

Objective 11: Promote participation of disabled Mäori
Actions
11.1 Build the capacity of disabled Mäori through the equitable allocation of resources within the context of Mäori development frameworks.

11.2 Establish more disability support services designed and provided by Mäori for Mäori.

11.3 Ensure mainstream providers of disability services are accessible to and culturally appropriate for disabled Mäori and their whänau.

11.4 Train more Mäori disability service provider professionals and increase the advisory capacity of Mäori.

11.5 Ensure that Government funded or sponsored marae-based initiatives meet the access requirements of disabled people (and encourage all other marae-based initiatives to also meet those requirements).

11.6 Support training and development of trilingual interpreters for Deaf people.

11.7 Ensure Te Puni Kökiri undertakes a leadership role in promoting the participation of disabled Mäori.

Objective 12: Promote participation of disabled Pacific peoples
Actions
12.1 Increase access to, and quality of, both Pacific and mainstream service providers that deliver disability services to disabled Pacific peoples, their families and communities.

12.2 Support disability workforce development and training for Pacific peoples, by training Pacific peoples as providers of disability information and services for their local communities.

12.3 Encourage Pacific communities to consider disability issues and perspectives and further their own understanding of disability through the development of community-based plans for disability issues.

12.4 Support training and development of trilingual interpreters for Deaf people.

12.5 Ensure the Ministry of Pacific Island Affairs undertakes a leadership role in promoting the participation of disabled Pacific peoples.

Objective 13: Enable disabled children and youth to lead full and active lives
Actions
13.1 Ensure all agencies that support children, youth and families work collaboratively to ensure that their services are accessible, appropriate and welcoming to disabled children, youth and their families.

13.2 Ensure that the Youth Development Strategy recognises the needs of disabled children and youth.

13.3 Conduct anti-discrimination and education campaigns that are age-appropriate and effective.

13.4 Establish a process for including advice from disabled people on disability issues for children and youth within relevant government agencies and Commissioners’ offices.

13.5 Provide access for disabled children, youth and their families to child, youth and family-focused support, education, health care services, rehabilitation services, recreation opportunities and training.

13.6 Improve support for disabled children and youth during transition between early childhood education, primary school, secondary school, tertiary education and employment.

13.7 Introduce ways of involving disabled children and youth in decision-making and giving them greater control over their lives.

13.8 Develop a range of accommodation options so that disabled young people can live independently.

13.9 Provide and evaluate educational initiatives about sexuality, safety and relationships for disabled children and youth.

13.10 Ensure the Ministry of Youth Affairs and Ministry of Social Policy undertake a leadership role in promoting the participation of disabled children and youth.

Objective 14: Promote participation of disabled women in order to improve their quality of life
Actions
14.1 Promote women’s rights and provide opportunities for disabled women to achieve the same level of economic wellbeing and educational attainment as men.

14.2 Provide equitable, appropriate and welcoming access to services.

14.3 Support disabled women to live independent and secure lives in the environment and with the people of their choosing.

14.4 Ensure that criteria and considerations for the health and reproduction-related treatment of disabled women are the same as for non-disabled women.

14.5 Include the perspectives of disabled women in the development of all strategies.

14.6 Ensure the Ministry of Women’s Affairs undertakes a leadership role in promoting the participation of disabled women, to improve their quality of life.

Objective 15: Value families, whänau and people providing ongoing support

Actions
15.1 Ensure needs assessment processes are holistic and take account of the needs of families/whänau as well as the disabled person.

15.2 Improve the support and choices for those who support disabled people.

15.3 Provide education and information for families with disabled family members.

15.4 Ensure that, where appropriate, the family, whänau and those who support disabled people are given an opportunity to have input into decisions affecting their disabled family member.

15.5 Develop a resource kit for professionals on when and how to interact with families/whänau of disabled people.

15.6 Work actively to ensure that families, whänau and those who support disabled people can be involved in policy and service development and delivery, and in monitoring and evaluation processes where appropriate.

15.7 Encourage debate around responsibility for caring, payment for caring and how to further recognise and value the caring role.

15.8 Provide families and those who support disabled people with information that is accurate, accessible and easily found.

APPENDIX : MEMBERSHIP OF THE NEW ZEALAND DISABILITY STRATEGY SECTOR REFERENCE GROUP

Ms Robyn Hunt (Co-chair)
Dr Jan Scown (Co-chair)
Ms Jennifer Brain
Mr Paul Gibson
Mr Les Gilsenan
Mr Mike Gourley
Mr Mark Lau Young (May-July 2000)
Ms Judith Lunny
Dr Nigel Millar
Ms Missy Morton
Ms Kay Neich
Ms Mary O’Hagan
Mr Graham Stairmand
Ms Lorna Sullivan
Mr Patrick Thompson
Mr Maaka Tibble

Comments

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Bob Marley 'Get Up Stand Up' Waiata to tautoko/support Disabled Liberation Aotearoa NZ DLANZ post relaunching original Whakanui Oranga NZ Disability Strategy 2001....Rather than what SS Al Nakba.-.NZ Ministry of Disability's new strategy 2016.- The Catastrophe. without a legal/historical framework and now taken off their site and consigned our 'original to GOOGLE Scholarly Articles after 15 years??..as a comparison..refer Treaty of Waitangi 1840...this would be unacceptable to Maori if John Key said Article 2 Tinorangatiratanga was removed....go figure...solidarity mateys.Sometimes its kool to boycott and am glad to not apply for joiining 'that' motley crew...kia kaha and keep smiling....Doug Hay
Cao'n Log
DLANZ Spirit of Wairore

Be warned fellow activists GENOCIDE...AL NAKBA.....this SS NAZI MEDICAL MODEL is trying to wipe away our rights by removing our heritage as some kind o smear on a culture dish, to wipe away...grrr remember history.Al Nakba - The Catastrophe ..attempted in Palestine.as was the policies of assimilation here in Aotearoa NZ and other forms colonized sovereigns...DLANZ sill hold hard copy and urge others to do the same...Nicky Wager has transformed herself and her Ministry of Social Destruction and Dementia ....a bit like their funding providers who claim to be 'advocates'....DLANZ Disabled Liberation will continue to stand with the Original Whakanui Oranga, its 15 Objectives and Aims 2001....Was an still is 'Our Treaty'....shame od those names on the Reference Group....the late Sharon Devonshire / Elizabeth Cooper/ Shane Gooderifge, among others would turn in their graves I'm sure and glad they are not alive to see this because all its appear is a complete submissive acceptance and no thought for our next generations......in Industrial times of the Coal Mines they used to have caged canaries to warn the workers of bad air and evacuate to safety....now its Unions / Iwi...Whakanui Oranga 2001 as like Te Triti o Waitangi 1840....both living documents spanning histories of women, men and children, across generations....kia kaha to them both...Waiata 'Canary in a Cold/Coal MINE...song by Sting or The Police....makes no diff...song remains the same

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