DLANZ Disabled celebrate International Day of Disability / Hauaa Music is the Word as Songs for Peace

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Today, 3 December 3, 2015 is International Day for People with Disabilities Auckland Radio Waatea celebrate this event interviewing a community organization who assist young disabled (age 6-25 years), to express themselves through music

Music is the Word as Songs for Peace...Waiata Song Hautoa - Oceania

Today, 3 December 3, 2015 is International Day for People with Disabilities and it was refreshing to hear Auckland Maori Radio / Radio Waatea celebrate this event with their Morning Show host interviewing a community organization who assist young disabled (age 6-25 years), to express themselves through music with Tutorial assistance (Star Jam)

DISABLED LIBERATION AOTEAROA NZ long has supported activities like this under New Zealand Disability Strategy / Whakanui Oranga 2001 Objective 9.2 “Provide opportunities for disabled people to create, perform and develop their own arts, and to access arts activities.” (NZDS 2001), and listening to this reminded me the history of disabled in the music industry here in Aotearoa NZ. Two examples come to mind; Maurice Priestly and Tracie de Jong.

The first I cam remember seeing a disabled fronting in a band was guitarist Maurice Priestly with the band Redeye who regularly played on TV Shows like Grunt Machine back in the 1970’s, who later ran a Studio in Gisborne. That was the time when living in Disabled institutions like Pukeora Home, where music played a big part in our lives, The Cravats were a band comprising of residents from the 1960’s followed a decade later by a younger set known as The Trailblazers (or as The Braille Trazers as we weren’t as good hehe). Both brought residents and staff together in an inclusive frame shared by all.

Tracie I met when moved to Mount Maunganui who alongside her husband Brian wrote and performed a rich variety of blues folk of real soul. Tracie maintained that disability was not a barrier and all were great role models for younger generations. Also family of disabled like artist Hinewehi Mohi of Oceania fame; mother / Whaea of disabled, gives a lot of energy into helping enhance the potential art expression can bring, not just as a therapy, but a more inclusive model of participation and valorization…..kia kaha / be strong to all

There are many aspects of World affairs that are in need of the attention of disabled on this occasion but something positive like art expression as forms of inclusion is sometimes the best form of revolution….No Guns

Keep smiling
Doug Hay
Coordinator DLANZ

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Waiata Song for this is ''Hineraukatauri'' by Hinewehi Mohi herself a mother of a disabled kid.....a great family....check out the video on Youtube....keep smiling

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