Wellingtonians take to the water to oppose deep sea oil drilling

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Members of Oil Free Wellington have taken to the water today to oppose Anadarko’s plans to survey the Pegasus Basin off the coast of Wellington for deep sea oil and gas.

The two Oil Free Wellington members entered the water at 10.30am this morning alongside the seismic surveying vessel the MV Duke. The vessel is in Wellington port today before departing to undertake the seismic survey. As of 11am they are still in the water with flotation devices and have attached a banner to the ship reading ‘Oil Free Seas’.

The ship has been contracted by Anadarko, a Texan based oil company that has permits to undertake exploratory deep sea drilling in the Pegasus Basin, Canterbury Basin and Taranaki Basin.

“Deep sea drilling threatens our coasts and marine life, and will contribute to catastrophic climate change and is simply not worth the risk. The seismic survey blasts can have an impact on marine mammals exposed to these sounds such as disorientation which could lead to stranding.” Said Oil Free Wellington spokesperson Jessie Dennis

‘We know that we need to keep 80% of known fossil fuel reserves unburnt to have a chance of keeping below 2 degrees of warming. Instead of locking ourselves into a fossil fuel intensive future, New Zealand should transition towards a sustainable and just society.”

A march to oppose the seismic surveying for deep sea oil in the Pegasus Basin will also take place tomorrow Friday 24th January at 12.30pm, beginning at Midland Park.

“New Zealanders have been coming out all over Aotearoa this summer to show their opposition to deep sea drilling and their desire for a oil free future. Anadarko should expect resistance to their plans at every step.“ Said Oil Free Wellington spokesperson Emma Moon

Oil Free Wellington is a group of Wellingtonians who are working to prevent deep sea drilling in the Pegasus Basin and for a more sustainable Aotearoa.

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