Why march against the latest rape report?

questions

Recently posted on Indymedia:
" The Roastbusters fiasco is another explicit reminder that there are huge problems with the way our society addresses sexual violence. We demand an end to rape and all forms of sexual violence. We demand that survivors of rape and sexual violence are supported, and that those responsible for raping and sexually violating people stop their actions. We demand that this extend to actions beyond examining the police force.

On Saturday 16th of November there will be a national day of action, calling for an end to Rape Culture and to stop groups like Roastbusters from 'getting away with it'.

NOTE: We do not think that physical violence towards rapists is an appropriate solution. Also, no abusive behaviour will be tolerated.

Please do not invite people who have been abusive in the past, as their presence at events can be triggering to survivors"

What does this reaction anticipate achieving?

If physical violence towards rapists is not an appropriate solution,what is?

Let me be clear.

I am against rape and all forms of sexual harrasment.

I can see that such a march might afford a feeling of solidarity to participating women.

It may well give participating males a virtuous feeling.

I like protest marches, they usually make me feel good but sometimes I wonder, is that all they do?

Most rape takes place in the home, in the flat, in the marriage.

How does such a march begin to address that?

Not trying to rain on anyones parade, just asking some questions about shit I care about.

Unless persuaded otherwise,I think the time would be better spent on sitting down together and grappling with the hard questions.
Hearing what;s happened and hammering out some practical on going steps to stop the day to day rape and domestic violence that will be ongoing after the last slogans echo has died away.

Comments

Commenting has now closed on this article.

Don - I have tried to answer your questions:

1. If physical violence towards rapists is not an appropriate solution, what is?

There were comments on the Auckland organisers’ facebook page that advocated raping the perpetrators, and there have been other calls to violent actions against them. It seems to be an all too common reaction to call for violence to be used against rapists. I don’t believe that premeditated violence will achieve anything, it only continues to support a culture of violence.

What’s needed is to break the cycle. That won’t be easy and it won’t happen this week.

The gang from West Auckland aren’t the only rapists in the country and just ‘dealing to them’ won’t change a thing.

2. I like protest marches, they usually make me feel good but sometimes I wonder, is that all they do?

That is a valid question about protest marches in general and a lot of people might agree with you. But why are you raising it in relation to this particular one now?

But a quick response is that, apart from being a show of numbers, protest marches provide a way for people to collectively vent their anger over something and to draw attention to an issue. That is why they generally are an appropriate response to an outrage.

3. Most rape takes place in the home, in the flat, in the marriage. How does such a march begin to address that?

What do you mean by ‘such a march’? The march is advertised as “calling for an end to Rape Culture.” Surely this includes “rape in the home, in the flat, in the marriage.”

Have you read Sean Plunket’s unusually good column today where he actually tries to answer this, and one of his key points is that “First, we collectively need to say ‘This is not OK’.” (http://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/comment/columnists/sean-plunket/9379586/Rapists-are-the-problem-not-clothing)

4. Unless persuaded otherwise, I think the time would be better spent on sitting down together and grappling with the hard questions.

If you believe that the time is better spent otherwise, are you organising something? I too believe that we should be working on changing our rape culture. I want to be involved in on-going work, and I assume that at the march we will be talking about what to do next and where to go from here. If nothing else is organised, I hope there will be enough like-minded people to get something going.

I am glad that someone is organising the march and I see it as a good opportunity to link up with others.

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